Tag - shamanism

Shamanic Healing and Training Programs Available in Sedona

The Shamangelic Healing Center of Sedona, AZ, is a premier, full-service healing practice for those seeking a more spiritually balanced life. Highly respected Shamanic Healer, Anahata Ananda, has integrated the training she’s received from shamans around the world into her personal healing practice and has developed four unique options for those specifically interested in Shamanic Journeys and Shamanic Healing.

In the last few decades, the exploration of Shamanism, Shamanic Teachings, tools, ceremonies, medicines, and healing modalities has risen dramatically. People are becoming disenchanted with the contemporary avenues to health, medicine and healing. There is a growing movement to bring ancient traditions into the modern era and many are turning to Shamanic Healers and Shamanic Practices for fresh approaches, soulful perspective, lasting results, and reconnection to the heartbeat of nature.

As an introduction to the Shamanic concept of animal spirit guides, Anahata’s CD, “Coming Home –Guided Visualizations for Clearing & Serenity,” is a wonderful starting point. This is a 67-minute guided visualization, broken into four focused meditations with musical accompaniment. The recording is a meditative journey, encouraging listeners to reconnect with divine nature and inner wisdom. The fourth meditation on the CD is an Animal Spirit Journey which helps listeners to locate a spirit animal. The animal spirit teaches true nature and is filled with symbolism to help guide listeners. The recording can be purchased directly from the website as a digital download or as a hard copy CD that can be shipped anywhere in the world.

The Shamangelic Healing Center also offers interactive group Shamanic Retreats that create a deep connection with others and with the earth. Sedona Shaman, Anahata Ananda, offers one of her signature workshops – Shamanic Soul Retreat – a number of times during the year in Sedona, AZ. This 4-day retreat takes participants on an adventure like no other. Curriculum includes an overview of Shamanic Teachings, several land journeys, and sacred Shamanic Ceremonies. The next retreat is September 24th-27th 2015 and is sold out. However, this retreat will be held again in both the spring and fall 2016, so please visit the link for a full description of the retreat and all updates.

Shamanic teachings have not died with the ancient cultures. More mainstream audiences are now turning to Shamanic Healers and Teachers to provide deep healing, spiritual alternatives, reconnection to nature and practices for living a more harmonious, conscious life. As such, many healing practitioners are also looking for ways in which to expand their service offerings. The Shamangelic Healing Center offers Shamanic Teachings & Tools Certification, a 3-day, 25-hour, in-depth course, from November 14th-16th 2015. This course is an overview of various Shamanic Traditions, Ceremonies, Animal Spirit Guides, Nature Teachers and Elemental Wisdom Teachings. There is an optional 4th day, with prerequisites, that can be added to the course. This is the 9-hour Shamangelic Breathwork Facilitation Training Course. Please visit the link for more details.

Finally, Anahata offers a selection of private Shamanic Healing Land Journeys for all. The journeys run from 2-5 hours or can be bundled into full-day or multi-day adventures. With its powerful vortexes, mystical caves, exceptional vistas, Native American medicine wheels, ancient cliff dwellings and captivating beauty, Sedona, AZ, is the perfect destination to begin deep soulful healing and awakening. The options are limitless as is the depth and variety of each experience.

About Anahata Ananda and the Shamangelic Healing Center:

Shamanic Healer and Spiritual Counselor, Anahata Ananda, has trained extensively with gifted shamans, energy healers and spiritual teachers from Peru, India, Asia and North America in order to artfully integrate the fields of Spirituality, energy healing, self-empowerment, shamanic teachings, emotional release, couple/family dynamics and visualization techniques. Blending the compassion and tenderness of an Angel with the wisdom and strength of a Shaman, Anahata guides journeys of profound healing and awakening. Her extensive client base spans the globe and includes business professionals, parents, couples, healers and individuals of all ages, who seek to heal and awaken their fullest potential.

Shamangelic Healing Center is based in Sedona, Arizona. Clients seeking Spiritual awakening, transformational healing services, conscious relationship counseling, sacred land journeys or training courses may choose from a wide range of options that will create a tailored personal experience. Anahata’s Shamangelic Healing Sanctuary is nestled beneath Sedona’s famous Thunder Mountain, with 360 degrees of breathtaking views, walking distance from an ancient medicine wheel and healing vortexes, making this the perfect setting for healing and expansion.

For detailed descriptions and a calendar of the upcoming retreats, workshops, courses, and transformational healing and spiritual awakening services offered by Anahata Ananda, visit http://www.ShamangelicHealing.com

Read more...

Shamanism in Sedona: Shamanic Healing Courses Announced

In the last few decades, the exploration of Shamanism, Shamanic teachings, tools, ceremonies, medicines as well as healing modalities has risen dramatically.Shamangelic Healing with Anahata, based in Sedona, Arizona is addressing this demand by offering a wide range of Shamanic healing services, healing sessions and courses in Shamanic studies. The Shamanic sessions now available are: The Shamangelic Healing Journey, Shamanic Breathwork Ceremony, Sacred Shamanic Land Journey, Shamanic Wisdom Walk, Animal Spirit Guide Journey and Medicine Wheel Ceremony, Soul Recovery Session and Shamanic Sound Healing Journey. Many of these sessions incorporate deep Shamanic emotional clearing techniques, shamanic breathing, guided visualization, vibrational sound and energy healing to facilitate profound emotional releases and open new channels of awareness. The Shaman’s utilized these and other practices to clear the mind, release density and usher a deeper connection to the spirit world.

Shamanic teachings have not died with the ancient cultures. Shamanic wisdom holds many answers to today’s life challenges. As a growing number of people become disenchanted with the traditional approaches to healing deep emotional wounds and traumas, more are turning to Shamanic healers and Shamanic techniques for fresh approaches to deep healing, soulful perspective, lasting results and reconnection to the heartbeat of nature. Sedona, Arizona, is one of the meccas for Shamanic resources. Droves of seekers are being called to Sedona to explore the wisdom Shamanism has to offer. Sedona’s breathtaking beauty and energy vortexes combined with the influence of Native American culture, provides the perfect setting for these experiences. Sedona Arizona’s premier center for Shamanic Healing and Spiritual Awakening, offers a full complement of Shamanic Healing sessions, Shamanic retreats,Sacred Land Journeys and Shamanic training courses.

The Shamangelic Healing Center also offers a 3-day Shamanic Wisdom Teachings Course which explores the in-depth soulful world of Shamanism. The courses cover an overview of various Shamanic Traditions, Medicine Wheel Teachings, Sacred Ceremonies, Animal Spirit Guides, Nature Wisdom Teachers, Elemental Wisdom Teachings and how to work with Land energies such as Vortexes and Labyrinths. Sedona provides a perfect learning environment for exploring nature wisdom and Shamanic teachings.

Sedona Medicine Wheel

Sedona Medicine Wheel

The Shamanic healer and teacher, Anahata has trained extensively with gifted shamans, energy healers and spiritual teachers from Peru, India, Asia and North America in order to artfully integrate the fields of energy healing, self-empowerment, shamanic teachings, emotional release, spiritual studies and visualization techniques. Blending the compassion and tenderness of an Angel and the wisdom and strength of a Shaman, Anahata guides journeys of profound healing and awakening. Her extensive client base spans the globe and includes business professionals, parents, couples, healers and individuals of all ages, who seek to heal and awaken their fullest potential.

Anahata is the founder of Shamangelic Healing based in Sedona, Arizona. Clients seeking Spiritual awakening, transformational healing services, conscious relationship counseling, sacred land journeys or training courses choose from a wide range of options in order to create a tailored personal experience. Anahata’s Shamangelic Healing Sanctuary is nestled beneath Sedona’s famous Thunder Mountain, with 360 degrees of breathtaking views, walking distance from an ancient medicine wheel and healing vortexes, making this the perfect setting for healing and expansion.

For detailed descriptions of the Shamanic healing sessions, ceremonies, land journeys and training courses offered by Anahata visit http://www.ShamangelicHealing.com

Read more...

Towards a New Model of Shamanism

by Michael Berman

Existing models of shamanism have tended to focus upon particular skills or states of consciousness exhibited by shamans and are therefore framed with reference to outcomes, rather than by attending to the processes of development leading to them. David Gordon Wilson, New College, Edinburgh in his paper “Spiritualist Mediums and other Traditional Shamans: Towards an Apprenticeship Model of Shamanic Practice,” (BASR Conference 2010) proposes an apprenticeship model as the basis of a new definition of shamanism. This, he argues, offers a distinctive, clearly-structured approach to understanding the acquisition and nature of shamanic skills, without being unduly prescriptive as to which particular shamanic skills should be anticipated in any given cultural setting. Not all shamans, however, necessarily accept apprentices – the nayogh [which translates as “people who are looking”] in Armenia today certainly do not, to give but one example. This is because it is believed that a person can only become a nayogh if they receive a calling, and not by becoming an apprentice to one. They will, however, sometimes pass on prayers that they use, though only through a member of the opposite sex. So if a married woman wanted a prayer, for example, it would be given to her husband by the nayogh to be passed on to her. Therefore, unless the apprenticeship can be regarded as taking place through what might consist of nothing more than a single vision, using such a model to describe the acquisition of all shamanic skills would not seem to be particularly helpful.

Another problem that arises when attempting to arrive at a satisfactory definition which can encompass all the different forms of shamanism is that in some cultures each practitioner develops his or her own approach to healing, which may include going into a genuine trance state, going into an imitative trance state, a demonstration of tricks, or a mixture of all three practices. And once again, this applies to the Armenian nayogh. So any definition of what being a shaman entails clearly needs to take such differences into account too. The following definition is therefore proposed:

A shaman is someone who performs an ecstatic (in a trance state), imitative, or demonstrative ritual of a séance (or a combination of all three), at will (in other words, whenever he or she chooses to do so), in which aid is sought from beings in (what are considered to be) other realities generally for healing purposes or for divination-both for individuals and / or the community.

As for the practice of shamanism, it is understood to encompass a personalistic view of the world, in which life is seen to be not only about beliefs and practices, but also about relationships-how we are related, and how we relate to each other. In shamanism the notion of interdependence “is the idea of the kinship of all life, the recognition that nothing can exist in and of itself without being in relationship to other things, and therefore that it is insane for us to consider ourselves as essentially unrelated parts of the whole Earth” (Halifax in Nicholson, 1987, p.220). And we now have proof of our interdependence:

[I]t has been shown that during mystical ecstasy (or its equivalent, entheogenic shamanic states [states induced by ingesting hallucinogens]), the individual experiences a blurring of the boundaries on the ego and feels at “one with Nature”; the ego is no longer confined within the body, but extends outward to all of Nature; other living beings come to share in the ego, as an authentic communion with the environment, which is sensed as in some way divine (Ruck, Staples, et al., 2007, p.76).

Further justification for the belief that all life is connected can be found in the fact that the elementary particles that make up all matter, by their gravitational, electromagnetic or nuclear field, are coextensive with the whole universe, and as man is composed of these particles, he must therefore be in union with the entire cosmos.

The phrase “a religion of ritual observance” has been used in particular to describe Shinto-“a religion not of theology but of ritual observance” (Driver, 1991, p.38).
However, other religions, apart from Shinto, could also be listed under this heading, Wicca for example. As in the case of Shinto, there is no one bible or prayer book in Wicca and the primary concern is not ethics, dogma, or theology. Rather, it is a religion of ritual practice. These practices include marking eight holiday “sabbats” in the “wheel of the year”, falling on the solstices, equinoxes and the four “cross quarter days” on or about the first of February, May, August and November. Many Wiccans also mark “esbats,” rituals for worship in accordance with a given moon phase (such as the night of the full moon). The same clearly applies to shamanism too.

Additionally, shamanism can be seen to be a kinship-based religion, in which kinship is not only understood to involve extended family links between members, but also, in the case of neo-shamanism, links between people who regard themselves as members of a particular community – neo-shamanic practitioners who regularly participate in a drumming group, for example. To complicate matters even further, though, there are also those who choose to work entirely on their own.

So what we are in effect dealing with is a kinship-based religion of ritual observance that in different cultures takes on different forms, and one that can even take on a variety of different forms within the same culture, as is the case in present-day Armenia.  And the definition being proposed here, unlike one based on an apprenticeship model or one that requires the shaman to perform an ecstatic ritual of a séance, has the advantage of being a comprehensive one; for it not only embraces all the forms of shamanism that have been practised, but also all the forms of shamanism that are being practised today.

References

Berman, M. (2007) The Nature of Shamanism and the Shamanic Story, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing. (For the definition of Shamanism)

Berman, M, (2010) Guided Visualisations through the Caucasus, Pendraig Publishing. (For the information on neo-paganism in Armenia)

Driver, T.F. (1991) The Magic of Ritual, New York: Harper Collins Publishers.

Halifax, J. (1987) “Shamanism, Mind, and No Self” in Nicholson, S. (comp.) Shamanism: An Expanded View of Reality, Wheaton: The Theosophical Publishing House.

Ruck, Carl A.P., Staples, B.D., Celdran J.A.G., Hoffman, M.A. (2007) The Hidden World: Survival of Pagan Shamanic Themes in European Fairytales, North Carolina: Carolina Academic Press.
Michael Berman works as a teacher and a writer. Publications include The Power of Metaphor for Crown House, The Nature of Shamanism and the Shamanic Story for Cambridge Scholars Publishing, Shamanic Journeys through the Caucasus for O-Books, and All God’s Creatures: Stories Old and New for Pendraig Publishing. To and from the Land of the Dead, his latest work, is due to be published by Lear books in 2011. For more information please visit www.Thestoryteller.org.uk

Read more...

The Spirit World Meets Western Medicine

By Emy E. Johnston

Judy Hilzer, 63 year old elder of the Sault Tribe of Chippewa Indians,  has been a nurse for over 40 years. It wasn’t until 2007 that Judy was recognized by the University of Washington Medical Center (UWMC) on the hospital’s spiritual care list as a shaman. Two years away from retirement, Judy is only now able to practice traditional methods of tribal healing within the western world of medicine.

Before her breakthrough, patients could only access priests, ministers, rabbis and energy workers. According to Judy, if a patient requested a shaman, the hospital could do absolutely nothing for them. One patient, awaiting a heart transplant, knew of her background in shamanic healing and asked her for help during surgery. Judy went to the head nurse asking if this was possible, and she was turned down. It was then that she recognized her calling.

She was told that in order to do such work she had to become credentialed. This wasn’t an easy task. Judy went through a rigorous credentialing process through the Patient Care Services department at the hospital. The process involved 15 pages of paperwork, forms that needed to be filled out by former teachers, testimonials from clients and statements detailing the types of services she would be providing. Her request to become credentialed as a shaman was so rare that a new committee was formed to handle alternative practices.

Like many other Americans, Judy recognizes that there is more to wellness than just the physical. This is what compelled her to become credentialed. Having worked within the guidelines of western medicine for so many years, Judy was well aware of the misgivings about this type of healing, and knows how traumatic hospital stays can be for patients. “Anytime we cut the body, put a tube in someone’s throat, or give them a new heart, we are doing the patient a disservice by neglecting the patient’s emotional healing,” Judy said.

Judy describes trauma as losing a part of ourselves, also described as soul loss. If we neglect to heal spiritually/emotionally we develop an emptiness in the body. “There cannot be a void in the body. It must fill with something.” This something Judy discusses can take on many physical forms. Sandra Ingerman, Educational Director of The Foundation for Shamanic Studies, also one of Judy’s teachers and supporters, says that, “soul loss is the most common cause of both physical and emotional disease.” Possible symptoms of soul loss include depression, anxiety, addiction and a feeling of emptiness.

Judy grew up disconnected from Chippewa methods of traditional healing. Her grandmother, who was of Chippewa and French Canadian descent, was raised in a boarding school, her language and traditions replaced by western ways. For Judy, being able to practice shamanic healing at her workplace is a way for her to reclaim her lost heritage, making traditional forms healing accessible to all. As she discussed the struggles of her grandmother, her deep brown eyes looked directly into mine, “Honoring them [the ancestors] became one more reason to carry on the work,” Judy said.

Judy reconnected with shamanic forms of healing through The Foundation of Shamanic Studies (FSS).  FSS is a non-profit incorporated educational organization that teaches shamanic healing methods that come from many different cultures. Judy has been studying these practices since 1992. Most recently she took a three year training course offered by the foundation through which she earned her Silver Certificate of Completion. She described this training as an initiation process. During her years of training with the FSS, Judy has learned how to do soul and power animal retrievals, extractions, and has learned to teach others how to journey to the spirit world on their own behalf.

A journey involves a person entering an altered state brought on “by ecstatic singing, dancing or drumming,” which enables “the shaman’s spirit leaves his or her body and enters the supernatural world.”[1] During a journey, the shaman will ask to be connected to spiritual guides and teachers on the behalf of the patient. In a soul retrieval, the shaman will ask of the location of lost soul parts that “disassociate” during trauma, bringing them back from the spirit world.

Since being formally added to the UWMCs spiritual care list, Judy has helped many people in the midst of crisis. She has aided several patients through surgeries, she has journeyed for patients in comas, helped people heal from past emotional wounds, and has even helped couples get and stay pregnant. Though, if you ask her, it isn’t her doing at all. “I consider myself a hollow bone, I do the work of spirit. It is a great honor.”

[1] Stutley, M. (2003). Shamanism an introduction. New York: Routledge.

Emy Johnston, Seattle native, is an active member of the artists for change community in the Pacific Northwest. She has performed theater, dance and spoken word internationally and locally. Emy’s art speaks to the power of reclaiming our identities. She recently discovered her passion for journalism, as she is currently a communications student at the University of Washington Tacoma. Emy is a board member of the Tribes Project, an organization that provides forums for high school age youth to produce and perform creative works that speak out against oppression. www.tribesproject.org

Read more...