Yoga helped woman conquer anorexia nervosa

Yoga helped woman conquer anorexia nervosa

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Unlike books on yoga that provide instruction on technique, Going Om: Real-Life Stories on and off the Yoga Matis a unique collection of never-before-seen personal narratives from celebrated authors. This anthology values the quality of writing over the authors’ flexibility. With candid, witty and compelling experiences of yoga from renowned memoirists, including forewordist Cheryl Strayed, author of #1 New York Times bestseller Wild, Going Om shares a range of observations about this popular practice.

Melissa Carroll has created a collection in Going Om that features a multitude of talented writers and yogis. One in particular named Emily Rapp, a memoirist and former Fullbright scholarship recipient, who shares how yoga helped her battle with anorexia. She provides an excerpt on Ravishly.com, a place to share her story with the world and how yoga has bettered her life in every aspect.

“Perhaps that’s the reason I admire the essays in this collection so deeply. Like shavasana, they seem to be one thing—writers on the subject of yoga—but really they’re another: profound examinations of what it means to be human. In these essays there are funny stories, sad stories, moving stories, and real stories. In sharing their experiences with us, each of these writers have tapped into the universal questions that we’re confronted with when we get ourselves down on the mat. Questions about humility and determination. Simplicity and acceptance. About moving forward, doing the work, and most of all, receiving with equanimity what comes next on breath at a time.”
—Cheryl Strayed, author of #1 New York Times Bestseller Wild

“Going Om is the literary equivalent of dropping in on class to find all your favorite yoga writers packed in there on their mats. Just like our bodies, every essay here is wildly unique—some are graceful, some are sexy, a few might make you cry—the only constant being the diverse ways these writer’s lives interact with their practice.”
—Benjamin Lorr, author of Hell-Bent: Obsession, Pain, and the Search for Something Like Transcendence in Competitive Yoga

Ms Carroll shares her story on Ravishly.com.

Melissa Carroll is a writer and yoga instructor who believes in the power of being present. Based in Tampa, she guides more than 200 students every week at the largest yoga class in Florida. Melissa leads yoga and creative writing retreats all over the world, and teaches creative writing at the University of Tampa. Melissa is the author of the chapbook The Karma Machine, and her work has appeared in many literary journals and magazines. Discover more at http://www.MelissaCarrollYoga.com.

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